Ndabuko Ntuli | Umlayezo Kamkhulu Wami: 18 May to 3 June 2018

In a ‘Message from my Grandfather’ Ndabuko Ntuli remembers and celebrates Masobeshe Ntuli, his late grandfather, who encouraged him to take up visual art from an early age.

Masobeshe was a prolific sculptor and this may explain some of Ndabuko’s extraordinary understanding of 3 dimensional form.

In this latest body of works Ndabuko continues to explore trash and found objects as his chosen medium. Bottle tops, painted wooden blocks, metal pins and plastic, are expertly layered by Ndabuko to create captivating artworks for which he has a strong and loyal global following.

Ndabuko has a unique skill set from most visual artists as he is also a talented musician, with 6 Maskandi albums to his name and he is also a practicing Sangoma.

In a recent dream, Ndabuko explains that his grandfather appeared to him, and discussed the significance of his artworks and his chosen medium.

Masobeshe explained that Ndabuko was tasked with giving life to trash, to show that even that what is considered useless has a value if respected. That if one could respect trash, one could respect all things.

Ndabuko Ntuli was born in 1975 in rural KwaZulu Natal, South Africa. He is married to the niece of Chief Mbangiseni Dlomo of the village of Isidashi. Whilst he has taken the decision to live and work in Alexandra in Johannesburg, his Zulu culture remains a central pillar of his life and influences his creative process.

His recent dream and respect for his culture has inspired him to explore an exciting new direction for his upcoming solo. In his latest body of work Ndabuko has chosen to revisit and draw influence from traditional Zulu design.

His use of primary colours and both rounded and geometric shapes, reminds one of the designs used in traditional Zulu earplugs, beading, attire and Zulu love letters.

On 17 May, Professor Pitika Ntuli, will officially open this exhibition, and Ndabuko will perform several new songs and poetry that he has composed in celebration of this event, his grandfather and his Zulu culture.

The exhibition runs from 18 May to 3 June 2018 at The Melrose Gallery, 10 High Street, Melrose Arch, Johannesburg.